September 16, 2021 |

Rabbi Emeritus Daniel Liben

Rabbi Daniel Liben was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary in 1983 and became the spiritual leader of Temple Israel of Natick in 1991. After 30 years as our Rabbi, he became our Rabbi Emeritus in 2021. He continues to lead a weekly meditation sit on Thursday mornings, our Sunday Morning Mindfulness Minyan, and teach in our Adult Ed program.

Rabbi Liben spent 18 summers at Camp Ramah in New England teaching Torah, facilitating prayer, guiding staff, and most importantly, teaching Israeli folk dancing.

Rabbi Liben first studied Jewish Mindfulness Meditation at Elat Hayyim, where his teachers included Sylvia Boorstein, Rabbis Sheila Weinberg and Jeff Roth, and Norman Fisher. That led him to the Institute for Jewish Spirituality (IJS), where he completed the Rabbinic Leadership Program and the Jewish Mindfulness Meditation Teacher Training program. He has taught Jewish Meditation to Rabbis and laypeople on several retreats. In 2019, he cofounded the Metrowest Jewish Meditation Collaborative, which offers monthly programs in local synagogues and online.

Rabbi Liben is available for workshops and Shabbatons exploring prayer as spiritual practice and Jewish Mindfulness meditation. In 2017, Rabbi Liben completed Hebrew Union College’s Bekhol Levavkha, a two-year training program in Spiritual Direction. He offers spiritual direction to Rabbinical students at Hebrew College and is available to guide others in this practice both in person and online. Rabbi Liben is a past president of the Massachusetts Board of Rabbis and of the New England Region Rabbinical Assembly, and he currently serves on the board of the Institute for Jewish Spirituality. He is married to Fran Robins Liben. They have 5 children, two of whom live in Israel, and 9 grandchildren.

 

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